Share Share |
Stone Crab
Home -> Stone Crab Facts Stone Crab Facts
 
NEXT DAY DELIVERY
 
Stone Crab Order Now
 
Key Largo Fisheries is a reliable source of fresh and frozen seafood and bait products that are packaged and shipped nationally and internationally. KLF offers a wide variety of products including fresh lobster, stone crabs, shrimp and fresh fish.
 
We are a proud to sponsor "Fresh from the Florida Keys".
 
Stone Crab Videos
Watch now!
 
 
 
Stone Crab Facts
 
DID YOU KNOW?
 
· Stone Crab Facts Fishermen take only the claws of stone crabs and return the live crab back to the water. Stone crabs can regenerate their claws the next time they molt.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Stone crabs are usually "right-handed," meaning that the larger crusher claw is usually on the right.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts The ability of adult stone crabs to feed upon mollusks can be attributed to the enormous crushing force of their claws - up to 19,000 pounds per square inch. Their pincer claws are used to cut or tear shell and tissue.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Stone crabs appear to be well suited for their habitat. The dark, unmottled color pattern of the Gulf stone crab helps it blend in with the mud substrates common to the northern Gulf estuaries, and the lighter, spotted color pattern of the Florida stone crab makes it difficult to see in grassy areas.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Geographic range: Gulf stone crab are found from northwest Florida around the Gulf of Mexico to the state of Tamaulipus, Mexico. Florida stone crab are found from west central Florida around the peninsula to east central Florida and North Carolina. An extensive hybrid zone occurs from the big bend area of Florida to west central Florida, and a smaller hybrid zone occurs from east central Florida through South Carolina. A hybrid zone is where the range of the two interbreeding species meet.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Habitat: Larvae are planktonic and are found in nearshore coastal waters and within estuaries. Juveniles inhabit hiding places such as crevices in and beneath rock or shell. Adult Gulf stone crabs are found on mud flats and oyster reefs in nearshore and estuarine areas. Adult Florida stone crabs live in seagrass beds or rocky substrate in higher salinity waters.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Life span: Males live to about 7 years, and females live to about 8 years.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Food: Larvae feed on smaller zooplankton (tiny floating animals). Juvenile and adult stone crab are generally opportunistic carnivores but sometimes eat plants also. Juveniles and adults both feed on oysters, acorn barnacles, conchs, sea anemones, flatworms, boring clams, blue crabs, hermit crabs, common mussels, and vegetative matter.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Growth rate: Growth in males is greater and more variable than in females.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Maximum size: Stone crabs can reach 5 ½ to 6 inches carapace width (the widest part of the body).
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Reaches reproductive maturity: Females mature at around 2.4 inches carapace width; males mature at around 2.8 inches carapace width. The carapace is the part of the exoskeleton that covers the first section of the crab's body.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Reproduction: Stone crabs mate after molting when the female is soft. Males deposit spermatozoa in the receptacle of the female. Eggs are fertilized within the ovary lumen. After fertilization and ovarian development, eggs are deposited in an external mass or sponge (160,000 to 1 million per egg mass) beneath the female abdomen. At this time, females are termed ovigerous, or egg-bearing. Eggs usually hatch within two weeks after they are extruded. Larval development takes approximately four weeks before metamorphosis to the juvenile form.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Spawning season: Spring to fall
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Spawning grounds: Mating sites have not been identified, but research has suggested that oyster reefs and seagrass beds may be important habitat for mating.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Migrations: Little is known about the movement and migration of stone crabs. They may move in response to environmental factors or seasons. Large males appear to move inshore in the fall to mate with molting females.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Predators: Adult filter-feeding fish, larval fish, and other zooplankton feed on larval stone crab. Predators of juveniles include other xanthids (crustaceans), grouper, black sea bass, and other large fish. Octopi, horse conchs, sea turtles, cobia, and grouper feed on adult stone crab. Juvenile stone crabs are more susceptible to predators than adults because they do not burrow or have the large claw of adults.
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Commercial or recreational interest: Both
  Stone Crab Facts  
· Stone Crab Facts Distinguishing characteristics: Stone crabs have a large crusher claw and a smaller pincer claw with numerous small teeth used for cutting. The Gulf stone crab is maroon brown, as compared to the Florida stone crab which is spotted and banded.
  Stone Crab Facts  
 
 
 
 
Stone Crab
Stone Crab Information   Stone Crab Recipes   Stone Crab Facts
Stone Crab Stone Crab Stone Crab Stone Crab Stone Crab
Stone Crab
Stone crabs are found along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts but are commercially harvested almost entirely in Florida. Adult stone crabs are easily recognized by their oval body and two large claws.

The adult body of the stone crab is dark brownish red, more or less mottled and spotted with dusky gray.
Stone Crab
Stone Crab Information
Stone Crab
 
Stone Crab
Marinated Stone Crab Claws
Stone Crab Recipes
Ingredients:
2 1/2 pounds frozen Florida stone crab claws
1/2 cup butter, softened
1 teaspoon curry powder
 
 
Stone Crab Recipes
Stone Crab
 
Stone Crab
DID YOU KNOW?
·   Fishermen take only the claws of stone crabs and return the live crab back to the water. Stone crabs can regenerate their claws the next time they molt.
·   Stone crabs are usually "right-handed", meaning that the larger crusher claw is usually on the right.
Stone Crab Facts
Stone Crab
Stone Crab